Tag Archives: Sweden

Swedish Christmas vocabulary

Christmas time is here. Again! Whether you celebrate the tradition of Christmas or not you might be interested in picking up a word or two in Swedish, related to the season.

I made and shared this poster on Swedish Christmas last year and have been asked to post it again. After all; it’s Christmas every year. 😉
This poster is free to print (you would make me happy though if you shared it or left a comment) – put it up somewhere where you make sure you lay your eyes on the words at least daily. Don’t forget to use the words!

Simply right click on the poster to print it.

 

Swedish christmas words
Svenska julord

Lucia

You have probably heard of Lucia; the Queen of Light who brightens the dark morning of December 13 in Sweden.

In short the tradition consists of a procession ( ett luciatÄg) with a Lucia up front, followed by handmaidens (tÀrnor), star boys (stjÀrngossar), brownies and elves (pepparkaksgubbar och tomtenissar). All but the brownies and elves wear white gowns. Lucia wears a light crown/wreath whereas the handmaidens each carry a candle. Lights can be battery operated; more likely the younger the children in the procession.

Lucia in Sweden
ett luciatÄg

There is beautiful singing. Either it really is, or you are a parent. These Lucia processions can be enjoyed at every preschool and school, and sometimes even at workplaces. Most towns have an official procession visiting hospitals and elderly, malls and libraries. There is also a national broadcast. You can find the Lucia concert broadcast on SVT. Search for Luciamorgon.

Want to know more? Watch Lucia for Dummies.

Swedish Lucia For Dummies from Sweden on Vimeo.

Learn Swedish Free Printable Fall

 

Learn Swedish free printable fall

Free printable – Learn Swedish Free Printable Fall

I love the fall and the colors of this vibrant season. Last fall it inspired me to make this printable design of Swedish words connected with fall in Sweden. I decided to repost it this year. Print and frame, or pin it somewhere. Pretty to look at and if you are learning Swedish you are killing two birds with one stone (“att slĂ„ tvĂ„ flugor i en smĂ€ll”)! Just click on the picture above, right click and select print and learn new vocabulary in a different way.

It is free for you to print however it would make me happy if you posted a comment and/or paid a visit to Globatris on facebook and liked it. You can also tweet the link super duper handy here.

 

Wordlist:
höst = fall
löv = leaf or leaves
varma jackor = warm jackets
Ă€pplen = apples
handskar = gloves
höstlov = fall break
blÄbÀr = blueberries
november = December – just kidding; November of course 🙂
familj & vÀnner = family & friends
skördetider = harvest times
promenader = walks
en god bok = a good book
skogen = the forrest
fÀrger = colors
lingon = lingonberries
Allahelgona = All saints
svamp = mushroom

Trevlig höst!

HöstsĂ„nger – fall songs in Swedish

HöstsÄnger kan vara ett sÀtt att lÀra sig svenska. TÀnd ett ljus, kryp upp i soffan och lyssna och mys. Försök förstÄ orden och sjung med i refrÀngerna! Du hittar en lista med förslag pÄ höstsÄnger lÀngre ned i inlÀgget.

“Höst” in Swedish means fall, or autumn. Fall is entering late this year. Some years it is even winter by now also in the southern parts of Sweden. This year however it is still meteorological summer in the south of Sweden.

However November is here, and so is the rain and the dark nights. So let’s light a candle or two, and listen to some music of the season, in Swedish of course. I have compiled a list of fall songs in Swedish. Criteria? They all contain the word “höst” in the title, except for the last ones on the list, and most of them are sung fairly clearly for you to be able to listen to the words. As usual, sing along to practice prosody! Not interested in singing but speaking 😉 ? If you need help to improve your Swedish  conversational skills go here to learn more.

Höst pĂ„ min planet – Lars WinnerbĂ€ck Lars WinnerbĂ€ck – Höst pĂ„ min planet

Höstens fĂ€rger – Mauro Scocco

Mellan sommar och höst – Marie Fredriksson

Höstvals – Tomas Ledin

Höstlegender – Masse, Petter

Innan höstlöven faller – Thorleifs

Hösten – Lisa Ekdahl

Höstlöven dansar – Nordman

Höst – Cajsa Stina Åkerström

Höstens guld – Sofia Karlsson

HöstkĂ€nning – Ola Magnell

Höstvisa – Ainbusk

Höst – Björn Afzelius

Gula höstlöv – Lasse Stefanz

Höst – Niklas Lind

Minns i november – Olle Ljungberg

November – Bo Kaspers orkester

November – Pernilla Andersson

Sjung nu med i dessa höstsÄnger! Lycka till!

Learn a language using both brain halves

Do you learn a language using both brain halves? Our brains are divided into two halves; hemispheres. They each take care of different activities. The right one is usually referred to as the visual and creative side, while the left stands for logical and analytical functions. It is suggested that a combination of both sides is beneficial when acquiring a language. I have tried this with success when I a few years ago ran language & craft shops combined for kids.

I also encourage you as a language learner to activate both brain halves when learning a new word. For instance – think of slicing a yellow lemon when you learn the word sour in a language; picture the drops of fruit juice on the slicing board. Best of all; taste a slice of lemon. Here is the word in Swedish – “sur”!

bowl of lemons
“Sur som en citron”
en citron = a lemon

Another way for you to activate both brain hemispheres when learning a language  is to follow instructions for something you do with your hands or body – either written or by watching a video – and do it. It could be craft, baking, a sports exercise etc.

What do you call a person from ___ (fill in the blank) in Swedish? nationalities

Nationalities in Swedish

Today I present a link to a list of countries and nationalities in Swedish. It can be found at TT NyhetsbyrĂ„n’s website as a tool for journalists, or anyone who writes. But we do use nationalities when speaking too, don’t we?

Here is the link.

The list is useful not only if you are learning Swedish but also to Swedes. There are quite a few countries around our globe and I am sure even as a Swede you will find a few nationalities on the list that you have never used before!

Fredagsmys

Say the word Fredagsmys and every Swede knows what you are talking about. An easy Friday evening get-together, to mark the end of the work/school week and the beginning of the weekend. Family or friends, easy cooking, snack and a TV-screen are ususally involved.  It could also include a board game. Tacos is a classic, as well as chips/crisps and dip; at least thatÂŽs what the commercials want us to believe. Veggies and fruit works too. Fredagsmys is part of our modern culture, probably substituting the Sunday dinner family gathering. The location and activity does not have to follow the description above; the importance of the matter is that it includes “mys”.

Teleskopord

Teleskopord

Ibland bildas ett nytt ord genom att tvÄ eller flera ord kombineras till ett.

Det kan vara sÄ att bara början pÄ ett ord och slutet pÄ ett annat finns kvar.

Delar av mitten kan ha försvunnit. Detta kallas ett teleskopord.

Exempel:

flextid = flexibel+arbetstid

friggebod = Friggebo + bod (Birgit Friggebo var bostadsminister 1979 och avskaffade bygglovsplikten för denna typ av byggnad)

hemester = hemma + semester

bankomat = bank + automat

blingon = blÄbÀr + lingon

burkini = burka + bikini

kvirkel = kvadrat + cirkel ( en sorts superellips)

plogga = plocka skrÀp + jogga

 

Teleskopord kallas ofta för portmanteau words pÄ engelska. Det svenska sprÄket har lÄnat mÄnga sÄdana frÄn engelskan.

Exempel:

ett motell = eng. motel (motor+hotel)

en brunch = eng. brunch (breakfast+lunch)

Vill du lÀsa mer om lektioner i svenska med mig? Engelsk text finns hÀr.

Lagom

Lagom

Outside of Sweden the word “lagom” seems to be trending this year. It takes over the Danish “hygge” and I expect to see books to be written on the subject. Or, wait; could really that much be squeezed out of the word lagom? To fill an entire book? Well, if hygge could 


Lagom is not trending in Sweden. It’s always around, always with us.

The urban legend has it that lagom derives from the Vikings; sharing the meal and the mead between themselves, using the same bowl. The words supposed to have been spoken were to not eat or drink more than that it would last “laget om” – the team around. Laget om then became lagom. Alas lagom means ”just the right amount, not too little not too much”. Lagom is a balance of things. Wether used for water temperature, amount of miles travelled during holiday, how much pick-and-mix candy the kids are allowed or how many guests are to be invited lagom is the answer.

A few examples in English and in Swedish:

Is it time to leave? Yes, it’s probably (the right) time. // Är det dags att gĂ„? Ja, det Ă€r nog lagom.

Isn’t it too cold to swim? No, it’s just about right/perfect.// Är det inte för kallt för att bada? Nej, det Ă€r lagom varmt.

Does the blouse fit you (refering to size) Yes, it’s good! // Passar blusen? Ja, den Ă€r lagom!

Is it lots to do at work at the moment? No, it’s pretty ok/the right amount of work. // Är det mycket att göra pĂ„ jobbet just nu? Nej, det Ă€r ganska lagom.